Safety during and after the storm throughout West Virginia

Throughout West Virginia, super storm Sandy has taken her toll.  Large amounts of rainfall in the east, high winds throughout our state, and heavy and large accumulations of snow in the Appalachians.  As our state continues to deal with the onslaught and after math of Sandy, please keep these safety tips in mind while venturing out onto the roadways:

10 Things to Know about Flood Safety

Flooding can occur as streams and rivers overflow their banks, when dams or levees break, with run-off from deep snow cover, or any time there is rainfall with significant duration and intensity.

Keep these facts in mind to stay alive and dry.

  1. Flash floods can come rapidly and unexpectedly. They can occur within a few minutes or hours of excessive rainfall, or when a dam or levee fails and even a sudden release of water held by an ice or debris jam. Be cautious during storm seasons, or any time that flooding is common in your area.
  2. You may not have warning that a flash flood is approaching.
  3. Do not drive unless absolutely necessary.
  4. Do not drive through flooded areas. If you see a flooded-out road ahead, turn around. Find another route to your destination.
  5. If there is no other route, get to higher ground and wait for the waters to subside.
  6. Even if the water appears shallow enough to cross, don’t try it. Water hides dips in the road. Worse yet, there may be no road at all under the water. Flooding can scour away the entire road surface and a significant amount of ground beneath.
  7. If your car stalls, abandon it immediately and climb to higher ground.
  8. Six inches of water will reach the bottom of most passenger cars, causing loss of control or possible stalling.
  9. One foot of water will float almost many vehicles.
  10. Two feet of rushing water can sweep away most vehicles — including SUVs and pick-ups.

Also see the thunderstorm driving safety tips

Sources: FEMA.gov, NOAA.gov, weather.com

Driving in Snow and Ice

The best advice for driving in bad winter weather is not to drive at all, if you can avoid it.

Don’t go out until the snow plows and sanding trucks have had a chance to do their work, and allow yourself extra time to reach your destination.

If you must drive in snowy conditions, make sure your car is prepared (TIPS), and that you know how to handle road conditions.

It’s helpful to practice winter driving techniques in a snowy, open parking lot, so you’re familiar with how your car handles. Consult your owner’s manual for tips specific to your vehicle.

Driving safely on icy roads

  1. Decrease your speed and leave yourself plenty of room to stop. You should allow at least three times more space than usual between you and the car in front of you.
  2. Brake gently to avoid skidding. If your wheels start to lock up, ease off the brake.
  3. Turn on your lights to increase your visibility to other motorists.
  4. Keep your lights and windshield clean.
  5. Use low gears to keep traction, especially on hills.
  6. Don’t use cruise control or overdrive on icy roads.
  7. Be especially careful on bridges, overpasses and infrequently traveled roads, which will freeze first. Even at temperatures above freezing, if the conditions are wet, you might encounter ice in shady areas or on exposed roadways like bridges.
  8. Don’t pass snow plows and sanding trucks. The drivers have limited visibility, and you’re likely to find the road in front of them worse than the road behind.
  9. Don’t assume your vehicle can handle all conditions. Even four-wheel and front-wheel drive vehicles can encounter trouble on winter roads.

If your rear wheels skid…

  1. Take your foot off the accelerator.
  2. Steer in the direction you want the front wheels to go. If your rear wheels are sliding left, steer left. If they’re sliding right, steer right.
  3. If your rear wheels start sliding the other way as you recover, ease the steering wheel toward that side. You might have to steer left and right a few times to get your vehicle completely under control.
  4. If you have standard brakes, pump them gently.
  5. If you have anti-lock brakes (ABS), do not pump the brakes. Apply steady pressure to the brakes. You will feel the brakes pulse — this is normal.

If your front wheels skid…

  1. Take your foot off the gas and shift to neutral, but don’t try to steer immediately.
  2. As the wheels skid sideways, they will slow the vehicle and traction will return. As it does, steer in the direction you want to go. Then put the transmission in “drive” or release the clutch, and accelerate gently.

If you get stuck…

  1. Do not spin your wheels. This will only dig you in deeper.
  2. Turn your wheels from side to side a few times to push snow out of the way.
  3. Use a light touch on the gas, to ease your car out.
  4. Use a shovel to clear snow away from the wheels and the underside of the car.
  5. Pour sand, kitty litter, gravel or salt in the path of the wheels, to help get traction.
  6. Try rocking the vehicle. (Check your owner’s manual first — it can damage the transmission on some vehicles.) Shift from forward to reverse, and back again. Each time you’re in gear, give a light touch on the gas until the vehicle gets going.
  7. More Tips

Sources: National Safety Council, New York State Department of Motor Vehicles, Washington State Government Information & Services, weather.com

The attorneys and staff at the Manchin Injury Law Group are dedicated to the safety of our state and community.  If you or a loved one have been injured due to the carelessness of someone else, contact us for a free consultation at 304-816-4097.

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About wvinjurylawblog

When you've been injured in some type of motor vehicle accident, hurt on the job or disabled because of a major illness — it is easy to feel overwhelmed and all alone in your fight to set things right. Most people don’t know where to start, who to talk to or what to say. Most people can’t get the insurance company to listen. And when you've lost a family member because of another's negligence, it becomes even easier to lose hope. There is no easy quick guide to show you how to find all the parties responsible for your injuries or how to coordinate and get the most benefits you need out of their insurance companies and sometimes even your own. At Manchin Injury Law Group, our experience with car accidents, motorcycle accidents, truck accidents, with other types of personal injury and wrongful death cases, and with social security disability claims will give you the voice you need to secure compensation and rebuild your life.
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